The Buzz

To pull or not to pull...

The battle over yellow nut sedge has begun in the new Nature Photography Garden (NPG). This is a serious weed, or plant thug as I like to call it, in the mid south and through out the United States.

The major issue with this weed is its tenacity. Growing in low damp areas, it spreads by underground stems (rhizomes), which are attached to small nodules or nuts. This leads to the plant forming small, but growing colonies which can extend to 10 ft. It also spreads by its tiny seeds.

Thinking about pulling it? Think again. When you pull this plant, you may pull some roots, but you are also breaking the rhizome, which forces the nodules to grow and produce a new plant, which produces more rhizomes and nodules and so on and so forth.

The best way to eradicate this trouble some weed is to spray it with an herbicide especially designated for nut sedge, such as Manage or Sedge Hammer with the active ingredient being Halosulfuron. For me and the establishment of the NPG, it is important to get this and many of the other troublesome weeds eradicated from the ground not only for the aesthetic reasons, but to also limit the seed bank. This will help keep weeds from popping up in the future and will let the desirable plants establish quicker.

So if you see yellow nut sedge, don’t pull it!! Instead, grab your sprayer and apply the correct herbicide, and save yourself many head aches in the future.

Posted by nick esthus at 11:12 AM


10/19/2012 at 07:17 AM by Dennis Riddle

Is this the same as "nut grass?"

10/22/2012 at 07:26 AM by Nick Esthus

Dennis, "Nut grass" is the same as "nut sedge", although the terminology used to describe this plant needs to be addressed. Cyperus esculentus, nut sedge, is a sedge and not a grass. When you look at nut sedge in cross section, it will appear triangular with the old saying being "sedges have edges". Also, grass such as Bermuda will have above ground nodes and internodes (growing points and space between growing points respectively). Nut sedge's nodes and internodes are at the base of the plant underground.

Leave A Comment

Please answer the simple math question below to submit the form.
2 + 2 =


For updates and more!

Enhancing lives by connecting people with nature to increase awareness and appreciation of our environment.


Central Daylight Time Hours:
9 a.m.-6 p.m.

Central Standard Time (Winter) Hours:
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Have a question?


Adults $8.00
Seniors (62 & over) $6.50
Children (2-12) $5.00
Children (under 2) FREE
Members FREE
* Handicapped Accessible

Group Visits



We are located at:
750 Cherry Road
Memphis, TN 38117
(Between Park & Southern)

Directions & Parking